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to read about henry clay and gone back in time. an extraordinary character. >> once he became lincoln in a filming of this, there was no more daniel day-lewis. >> absolutely. when i went to richmond to the set, they would have pictures of sally field and mary there and thaddeus stevens and tommy lee jones and at the top it said lincoln. the guy who played stanton said he was so nervous about meeting dain yell day and told you have to call him mr. lincoln. stanton had hurt lincoln in reality in the 1850s. i apologize, mr. lincoln for having hurt you in the 1850s and daniel day, says, it's all right, i've for given you. >> when they heard him coming down the hall, here comes the president. >> i think of you as a movie star and you have a movie star brought a clip from the film. get this clip up in terms of what we're seeing and brief look inside the movie. >> the main things that happens, lincoln makes a decision that he needs the 13th amendment because once the war ends, the emancipation pro clamation will no longer have legal validity. he was only able to issue it because it was a war
the country to attend when great titans like henry clay and daniel webb -- nathaniel webster and john c. calhoun worked debating but imagine a much smaller senate chamber crowded with men who might have hated each other and were elbow to elbow with their small vests, reeking of cigar smoke, smelling of gas from gas lamps, carpet, which the tunes scattered here and there meant spitting in one direction or the other, often missing and intense, congested atmosphere with political men going monomonoe. monowith the editorial arena and indentured america. >> two of those men, henry clay and steven douglas, what was their the role of the compromise? >> henry clay was called out of retirement in kentucky to take charge of an attempt to create some kind of a compromise. he was known as the great compromise or for husbanding the compromised in the 1820s, the missouri compromise and also the 1833 compromise that brought the country back again from crisis over south carolina's nala vacation of the federal law. henry clay was a grand, remarkable man and he never once said no when he was invited to t
of "america's great debate: henry clay, stephen a. douglas, and the compromise that preserved the union." what was so great about the great compromise? >> well, most of us if we don't know anything about the compromise. the vaguest recollection from junior high school said there was a crisis in 1850. the nature of the crisis was this. the country went to the brink of civil war. most of the political culture and most americans that war was going to take place, that the deep south was going to succeed and they were much closer to succession than most americans even today realized. certainly the deep south states. texas was arming. other southern states to texas. why am i talking about texas? had there been a collision? headwear began in 1850, when it begun in charleston, would've begun in santa fe, new mexico. why? because texas with its own imperial ambitions to move westward in the slaveowning south aim to invade new mexico territory. there were many come in many other parts of the crisis fundamentally whether or not so much of the slaves in 1850 the south was militarized. southern nationalism
was and what he did. one of two americans, so well-known. the great kentucky statesman, henry clay, and william henry seward of new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the country. here i am. i am ready to start. [applause] >> henry clay had been dead for eight years by 1860. he was a major figure in american politics. he was known as a great compromise or when the great pacific theater. on three occasions in 1820 in 1832 in 1833, he had a major role in shaping compromise. still, that doesn't bring him down to 1862 us. he comes down to us because abraham lincoln looked to clay as his political mentor. he was his political hero and he called him the ideal of the statesman. lincoln's best-known remark on clay, came in a eulogy he delivered in the week after clay's death. he praised the statesman's leading and most conspicuous part of sexual compromise. at the same time, he underscored that as a politician and statesman, no one was as careful as clay consider all grounds. he worked with political opponents as well
and then the election of james k. polk versus henry clay, and you talk about how vicious they were. is today's election, the turn one we're in, vicious compared to the ones we talk about? >> guest: actually, no. it's probably more gentle by comparison if you look another some of the things said. for instance, going back even further to 1796, the first contested election, when john adams and thomas jefferson, the compatriots 20 years earlier who combined to bring the declaration of independence into being were now fierce political rivals. they maintained a friendship of sorts as jefferson served as adams' vice president, which was the result of the way presidents and vice presidents were elected back then. something that changed soon after. jefferson and adams had begun to form what were the beginnings of the two political parties, adams, a federalist, along with alexander hamilton, who was no great friend or ally of john adams, and jefferson on the other side of what was then known as the democratic republican, and that's why alluded to the fact that jefferson said, we are all federalists, we're all re
versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. is today's election, the current fund we are red, vicious compared to the ones we just talked about? >> guest: no, it's probably more general and person if you look at some of the things said. for instance, going back further to 1796, the first contested election when john adams in thomas jefferson, that the teacher is 20 years earlier, who had combined to really bring the declaration of independence into being were now fierce political rivals. they had maintained a friendship of sorts as jefferson served as vice president, with the result affiliate presidents and vice presidents elected back then, something that changed soon after. jefferson and adams had begun to form what were the beginnings of the two political parties, out of the federalists along with alexander hamilton, who is no great friend or ally jihad atoms by the way and jefferson on the other side has been known as the democratic republican. that's why alluded to the fact that jefferson and when he was inoculated said we are all democrats a
. probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay. the great kentucky statesman. probably few know of william henry in 1860 was a senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency, was by far the most notable and well known republican in the country. finally, here i am. ready to start. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. from the jefferson library in char latesville -- relationship to slavery. he reports that -- ownership and labor of the slaifts but america's third president called silent professionals. and jeffrey jefferson's papers in the research. it's just over an hour. >>> our guest speaker this afternoon is henry weincek he will be talking about his book. it's the subject which the thomas jefferson foundation has been a pioneer in researching and presenting largely to the work of senator stanton who collected essays were published earlier this year by the university of virginia press. they're entitled those labor to -- [inaudible] slavery the thomas jefferson's. the regard is an authority on the subject. the book was
a number of you are familiar with henry clay, the greek and turkish statesman. probably fewer have heard of henry seward, 1860, the senior senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and on the republican in the country. finally, ready to start. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> i wanted this to be in tensely journalistic. unless you get out and look at what is going on these days is going to miss the things that are influencing yourself and everybody else. >> best-selling author and journalist tom wolfe is live at 6:00 p.m. eastern from this year's opening night in miami book fair international discuss his latest novel and its take on the city of miami plus answer questions from the miami audience. later tonight, and the fine print david k. johnson looked at the way corporations attempt to rob you blind. at nine eastern and pacific on book tv on c-span2. >> here's a look of some books that are being published this week.
if you are probably familiar with henry clay, the great kentucky statesman. and william hen
of the henry clay center for statesmanship. the way to a solution, he says, is for both sides to have a voice. >> both have taken the attitude that it's my way or the highway. and americans recognize that that's just not the way things typically get done in this country. and if we continue along that line, we will go over the fiscal cliff and who knows what the abyss beyond it will be like. >> reporter: the united states senate's always valued its reputation as the world's greatest deliberative body set apart from the political passions of the moment. the roll of mitch mcconnell and fiscal cliff talks will put that reputation to the test. john harwood, cnbc, lexington, kentucky. >>> the new york mets and david wright agreeing on a $138 million, eight-year contract making it the richest deal in franchise history. the timing might work out well for mr. wright as well in light of the upcoming fiscal cliff. it is affecting the world of baseball, business, average americans, you name it. brian schactman is here to help me out a little bit with my laryngitis today. >> i should have brought some tea
of you are familiar with henry clay, the great kentucky statesman. publicly fewer of you believe henry seward in 1860 was the senior senator from new york state prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the country. and finally, here i am, ready to start. >> lien-hang nguyen presents her work, "hanoi's war: an international history of the war for peace in vietnam." it's about 40 minutes. [applause]? >> wow, how do you live up to the introduction? thank you so much, max. it's great to be here today. lie before i begin i would like to y thank the folks at the library of congress for letting tme pai of this wonderful event. so i'm sure everyone here in this tent would agree with you t when i say memory. although this year marked what president obama declaredded as the 50th anniversary of the start of that war, it doesn't seem like the conflict started a half century ago, but the war is recent, kept alive by constant references with the result of hollywood films like the ones max lifted or national headlines eluding to compar
did. the other two not so well number. probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay. the great kentucky statesman. a probably few know hen -- in 1860 was at senior senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the country.
said jefferson was a barbarian who could hardly run his name and so he got together with henry clay who had the votes in the presidential election and promised him to be the secretary of state and they pull their votes together in the house of representatives and that's how he was elected to the presidency. in the next election by then, jackson had gone around the country dillinger popular maturities and getting along changed from state to state to state and which providing for the universal right male suffrage which took the votes out of the hands of property owners and gave it to the barbarians as john quincy adams might say. >> john quincy adams deal with clay and 1824 was that ethical by the standards of those days retrospectively by our standards? >> is certainly was in those days. he took on a flat board. the choice in his mind was to turn the country over to a barbarian who couldn't write his name who had violated the constitution act will during a the war of 1812 had gone into the seminal doing whenever he felt like doing. he did not want to see this man president. >> you descri
pulled some strings and produced a victory for adams. i think, in many ways, he regretted that and henry clay, the speaker, more that as a stamp of shame for the rest of his days and prevented him from ever becoming president. and trying to think of the third time. it will come to me. caller: hello. good morning. happy election day. why do you think of voter fraud is such a hot-button issue? do you think will actually cut down on voter fraud if we were to require identification at the polls? guest: again, these hot-button political issues, i prefer to leave them to people who deal with this for a living. personally, i have not studied this question as closely, obviously, as some of these other people have. my sense is that there's a disproportionate effort being made in the name of preventing voter fraud, whether it is intended to or not, has the effect of cutting down on the legitimate spread a parrot -- spread of error. host: gerald ford, jimmy carter. guest: he had the burden of the nixon name and the economy was in pretty bad shape. by the last weekend, gallup showed up by one. that
. the other two are not so well-known, so probably a number of you are familiar with henry clay, the great kentucky statesman. probably a few now henry seward in 1860, a senior senator from new york state and prior to lincoln's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well-known republican in the country. now finally here i am, ready to start. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. spent up next, author and lecturer steven johnson, best selling science writer talks about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including "everything bad is good for you," "where good ideas come from," and his 2012 release "future perfect." >> host: steven johnson, in your newest book, "future futura perfect: the case of progress in a networked age" use the tere pure progressive. what iss that? >> guest: is my attempt to come up with a term for this new political philosophy that i seeo emerging all around me. e. the book is really kind of a series of stories about these peopl
was and what he did. the others are not so well known. you will be familiar with henry clay a great kentucky state's mind 1860 from new york state and prior to ligon's nomination for the presidency was by far the most notable and well known republican in the country. here i am ready to start. >>> up next, author and lecturer stephen johnson the bestselling science writer talks about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including everything that is good for you; where good things come from and his 2012 release "future perfect." >> >> host: steven johnson in your new book future perfect th case for progress in the networked age you use the term pure progressive; what is that? >> guest: it's my intent to come up with a term forttempt to come up with this newerm for this new political philosophy that i see emerging all around me. the book is really people who are trying to change the world in trying to ban progress, but he don't completely fit the existing models that we have between the left in the right
runs a small college here and sits on the board of the henry clay center for statesmanship. the way to a solution, he says, is for both sides to have a voice. >> both have taken the -- attitude that it is my way or the highway. and americans recognize that that's just not the way things typically get done in this country. and if we continue along that line, we will go over the fiscal cliff and who missouri what the abyss beyond it will be like. >> the united states senate has always valued the reputation as the world's greatest deliberative body set apart from the passions of the moment. the role of mcconnell and fiscal cliff talks will put that reputation to the test. john harwood, cnbc, lexington, kentucky. >>> let's get back to our guest host today, former chairman and ceo of honeywell. john laid out what a difficult negotiation this is going to be because both sides have entrenched and said basically we want to do it our way. i continue to not hear this talk of really bipartisanship of working together to try to find a solution. that worries me a lot. >> i think it should. you k
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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